Archive for October, 2010

Open Research Strategies and Tips Workshop in the Library

Friday, October 29th, 2010

Learn some strategies and tips to help you find relevant and credible sources for your papers. Develop skills for conducting more effective searches in the databases, which will help you save time and locate good articles that you can print, save, email, or read right away. Do the research, so you can start writing your outline, speech, or paper. Time will be provided to allow participants to conduct their own research. Come late if you need to.

According to the needs of the participants, suggestions on how to narrow topics, how to find the full text to an article when the citation is available, and how to locate statistics may also be discussed.

Get some help from a librarian. : )

Workshop #1
Tuesday, November 2nd
11 am until 12:30 p.m.

Workshop #2
Wednesday, November 3rd
1-2:30 p.m.

Workshop #3
Thursday, November 4th
3:30-5 p.m.

To sign up for a workshop:
Call: 282-3152
Email: refinst@isu.edu
Visit: The reference desk on the main floor of the library.

Are you disappointed that the dates and times do not fit your schedule? Take a look at some of the quick tutorials available on the Tutorial page.

Still not satisfied? Call the reference desk, or send an email via Ask a Librarian.

This announcement was submitted to Library News by Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction at Oboler Library.

Phrase and Proximity Searching

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Last week on the information literacy and instruction listserv, someone asked about changes to EBSCOhost’s search function. When searching for a phrase, she surrounded the phrase with quotation marks: Ex. “reality tv.” Results highlighted these words even when they appeared separate from each other. Only results that include the phrase itself will be returned; however, wherever either of the words appear it will be highlighted.

Changes to their software make it so that any terms entered into their search are defaulted as both a phrase and a proximity search. In the past the searcher needed to enter w/5 to specify a proximity search. Now the proximity search takes place simultaneously with the phrase search. Another contributor to the listserv suggested the following kind of search: geoffrey chaucer not “geoffrey chaucer”. Within the Academic Search Complete database, 348 results came back today. “geoffrey chaucer” brought back 702 results, but geoffrey chaucer without any quotes returned 1050, the sum of the other two results.

It seems that most searchers rarely use proximity search commands, but in many instances it may yield more relevant results that just a plain keyword search. Personally, the help section on proximity searching contains some cool, though probably arcane search tips. A search for child* w/3 obesity would return results with the words child, children, childhood, etc. within three words of obesity, but child would always come before obesity.

EBSCOhost’s help page gives a great example of the near command. tax n5 reform* would bring back results where the words “tax reform” appear as well as “reform of income tax,” because they are within five words of each other.

This “Research Tip” was submitted by Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction at Oboler Library.

New Book for Writers

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Writers and Their Notebooks, edited by Diana Raab, is now available at Oboler Library. I recently saw the book advertised in Poets and Writers Magazine (find the current issue on the Current Display shelf at Oboler Library), and it sounded so good that I filled out a “suggest a book for our collection” request (under “Find Books”.)

Having kept a journal/writer’s notebook for the past 27 years, I have read a lot about the topic, and found this book to be excellent. Contributors include Sue Grafton, Dorianne Laux, Phillip Lopate, Diana Raab, Kim Stafford, Maureen Stanton, and many more. It is relevant to both writers and readers of journals, poetry, and nonfiction. I know it’s a book I will check out again, and may even buy my own copy. It makes me want to write a lot more, and while reading it I even had a couple of occasions when I set the book down and picked up my journal to write.

In addition to enjoying and learning from many of the essays, I found the appendices helpful: “Use Journaling to Spark Your Writing,” “A Journaling Workout” (writing prompts), and”Further Readings”. This book led me to request an Interlibrary Loan of Dear Anais: My Life in Poems for You, also by Diana Raab. I thoroughly enjoyed her poems. Since Pocatello has many creative writers, Writers and Their Notebooks is a good addition to our collection of writing books.

This book review was submitted to Library News by Joan Juskie, Library Assistant at Oboler Library and editor of Library News.

Documentary Films in the Library Collections

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Did you know that the library has a large collection of documentary DVD’s and videos? You’ll find some favorites from PBS shows, from attending films at the Bengal Theatre sponsored by the Pocatello Independent Film Society, or from ISU Community Cinema (previews of new PBS shows–the next one will be next month Deep Down at 5:30 on Tuesday Nov. 16th—watch for information on the bulletin boards and ISU calendar).

Some of my favorite PBS movies include Affluenza and Escape from Affluenza. You may remember several years ago Affluenza was the university reading project book, and the two authors, John de Graff and David Wann came here for the programming. I noticed that the wonderful documentary National Parks: America’s Best Idea by Ken Burns is on order for our library. Since it made me a new fan of Ken Burns, I noted his Jazz and Civil War series are here also! There are many Frontline, Bill Moyers, and other well known PBS shows listed in the catalog. River of No Return: Idaho’s Scenic Salmon River and Idaho Edens are also here. Finally, I noticed Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsburg and the Pentagon Papers, which I was just watching a re-run of several days ago.

Some of my favorite documentaries from the Pocatello Independent Film Society movies are in our catalog also, including: Food Matters: You Are What You Eat (a nutrition film), An Inconvenient Truth (the global warming movie by Al Gore), Trudell (about Native American poet John Trudell), and The End of Suburbia: Oil Depletion and the Collapse of the American Dream.

Browsing the catalog , a number of other films stood out. Supersize Me by Morgan Spurlock is available. The Cooking Method Series of the Culinary Institute of America sounded interesting. I’ll also want to check out these:
Jon Stewart on Humor and an Informed Public;
The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don’t Need with Juliet Schor;
Rosalie Sorrels: Way Out in Idaho;
Sixties: The Years that Shaped a Generation;
and the on order film, Escape from Suburbia.

This article is by Joan Juskie, Library Assistant and editor of Library News. Watch for a future Library News article where Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction, will cover searching for DVD’s and videos, and some of our fiction and entertainment movies.

Research Strategies and Tips Workshop in the Library

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Learn some strategies and tips to help you find relevant and credible sources for your papers. Develop skills for conducting more effective searches in the databases, which will help you save time and locate good articles that you can print, save, email, or read right away. Do the research, so you can start writing your outline, speech, or paper. Time will be provided to allow participants to conduct their own research. Come late if you need to.

Get some help from a librarian. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend.

Workshop #1
Tuesday, October 19th
2-3:30 p.m.

Workshop #2
Wednesday, October 20th
12:30-2 p.m.

Workshop #3
Thursday, October 21st
3:30-5 p.m.

To sign up for a workshop:
Call: 282-3152
Email: refinst@isu.edu
Visit: The reference desk on the main floor of the library.

Are you disappointed that the dates and times do not fit your schedule? Take a look at some of the quick tutorials available on the Tutorial page.

Still not satisfied? Call the reference desk, or send an email via Ask a Librarian.

This announcement was submitted to Library News by Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction at Oboler Library.

Online Library Tutorials

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction at Oboler Library, recently completed three new tutorials that are on the tutorials page, along with the seven that were already completed. Topics include Finding Articles, Finding Dissertations, Job Searching, Course E-Reserves, and more.

Three new tutorials have been posted to the tutorials page. They are Database Features, Finding Scholarly Articles, and Narrowing a Topic.

Multimedia Tutorials

These tutorials include an audio component and run automatically.

· Books for Distance Students? Document Request & Delivery (3 minutes 35 seconds)

· Course E-Reserves: Finding Your Professor’s Electronic Documents (2 minutes 34 seconds)

· Database Features: How to Use the Databases Best (4 minutes 6 seconds)

· Do You Have My Article? Searching the A-Z Journal List (1 minute 38 seconds)

· Finding Scholarly Articles (2 minutes 23 seconds)

· How Can I Find Dissertations? Using ISU’s Resources to Conduct More Exhaustive Research (12 minutes 31 seconds)

· Job Searching: Finding a Job (9 minutes 22 seconds)

· Narrowing a Topic: General Tips (4 minutes 59 seconds)

· Need an Article? Article Request (4 minutes 49 seconds)

· Reference Books: Limit Results by Location in the Library Catalog (2 minutes 30 seconds)

This announcement was submitted to Library News by Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction at Oboler Library.

Expand Your Search Results!

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Tip: Did you know you could expand your results with an asterisk or a question mark? This can be helpful if you need more results.

For example, if I were searching for information on prescription drug abuse, I could “truncate” each word to get more results. Ex: prescri* and drug* and abus*. This tells the database to search for variations of the different words: prescribing, prescribe(s), prescription, drug(s), druggie, abuse(s), abusing, abusive, etc. When your search returns many results, this strategy is not recommended, but when you are getting too few results that you want it may be helpful.

Note: the asterisk (*) is the truncation code used in the majority of databases (Ebscohost, LexisNexis, ProQuest, etc.). The question mark (?) serves as the truncation code in the Library catalog. Therefore, pigment? would return records with the following words: pigment(s), pigmented, pigmentation, pigmenting, etc. Truncating back to “pig*” would not be so helpful, since it would return results about “pigs” the animal, about humans acting like pigs, as well as painting with pigments, etc.

This quick research tip was submitted by Spencer Jardine, Coordinator of Instruction at Oboler Library.

Book Swap and Book Sale Racks in the Library

Monday, October 11th, 2010

The library is good for more than study and research! If you need some easy reading to enjoy, you can grab some leisure reading at the library! Or if you are looking to add a few used nonfiction books to your home library, we have some of those too. We have two book racks of items available without any check out or overdue restrictions: the Book Sale Rack and the Book Swap Rack.

BOOK SALE RACK: Buy some great books for 50 cents (paperback) or $1.00 (hardback)! Oboler Library has an ongoing book sale. If you’ve ever been to the Biennial Used Book Sale, you’ll remember what good books we had!

book sale Items offered for sale are available near the New Books area of the First floor. It includes academic books, nonfiction, and some fiction. This “stock” will be replenished as needed, and more books are being added regularly! You pay for them at the Circulation desk. So, come by, have a look, and stop by regularly to see the new items that have been added. This is a great way to stock up on reading for school breaks, and to add to your home book collection.

book swap rackBOOK SWAP RACK: This rack was installed as part of National Library Week three years ago, and moved into the student lounge area after the Book Sale Rack was installed. Many individuals have taken advantage of this service in swapping titles. A variety of genres are available on the rack, including westerns, thrillers, mysteries, classics, adventures, romances, and a little nonfiction. Come to the library to see what is available! Bring a paperback of your own to swap for a title that interests you. If you have multiple paperback books you are willing to share, or want to unclutter, please feel free to add them to our Book-Swap Rack so others in our campus community can enjoy a wider array of options for their reading pleasure.

Banned Book Title Poetry Winner

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

In celebration of Banned Books week the library hosted a Banned Book Title Poetry contest. See the earlier article here: Banned Books week and Banned Book Title Poetry contest, and read all the contest entries. The 11 entrants had their name entered into a drawing for a free 1 GB jump drive. The winner of the drawing was Sharen Caldera for her poem titled “The Fighting Ground.” The Events committee enjoyed all of the poems, and included all of them on a display that is up on the bulletin board near the Administration offices in the library. Stop by for a laugh and an enjoyable moment of seeing some of ISU’s creativity. Watch for the contest again next fall when we celebrate Banned Books Week once again.

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ISU Library Exhibits Art by Georgia Orwick

Monday, October 4th, 2010

Georgia Orwick’s “Honoring the Ancients” is a series of paintings inspired by the exploration of ancient rock art sites in the rugged sierras of Baja, Mexico and well as sites in North America. Her watercolor, mixed media, and pastel paintings will be on exhibit in the current display area of the Idaho State University’s Eli M. Oboler Library from Monday, October 4 through Friday, November 12, 2010.

orwick 1Orwick’s fascination with rock art evolved from an appreciation for the sense of individuality, animation, and the use of color by the ancient painters. Her research into Baja rock art quickly led to Dr. Harry Crosby, the modern-day explorer who discovered more than two hundred previously undocumented sites known only to the local ranchers. Dr. Crosby’s discoveries led to further hunter-gatherer archeological research by the Mexican government. His discovery of the “The Great Murals—Los Gran Murales” is now the official title of the region.

The monumental scale of the stunning pictographs in “The Great Mural Region” rival the finest cave paintings in the world. The paint from the sensitive, dynamic, sophisticated figures has been carbon dated to nearly 10,000 years old, making them among the oldest, most unique, significant concentration of ancient rock art in the Americas. As the fifth largest rock art region in the world, it has now been designated as a Heritage Site by the United Nations.

orwick 2

The captivating story of Dr. Crosby’s discoveries is beautifully written with fascinating photographs, detailed drawings, and excellent maps in The Cave Paintings of Baja, California— Discovering the Great Murals of an Unknown People, first published in 1975. Dr. Crosby has invited Orwick to paint from his 2,000 digitized photos and exquisite illustrations by his wife, Jo Anne, in the UCLA Archives. Orwick’s exhibition includes paintings from the Crosby Expeditions.

OrwickRaised on the vast North Dakota prairie, Orwick is inspired by her fascination with mountains, horizons, sea and landscapes, and scenes from her travels. For eighteen years she cruised on a motorcycle to the end of many roads: from British Columbia to Nova Scotia, to Florida and to the deserts of the Southwest. She traveled extensively from Alaska to Mexico and to the Panama border in Central America. Since moving to Pocatello in 1996, Orwick’s award winning paintings have been exhibited in local and national shows. Her artistry as a Master Gardener and landscape designer has won many awards for the Juniper Hills Country Club and private gardens.

The exhibit is free and open to the public and may be viewed during regular library hours. For more information, including schedule changes, contact the library at 282-3248.