Archive for June, 2014

Rock Walk App

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Explore the ISU Centennial Rock Walk this Summer!

Students and a faculty member in an Idaho State University Civil Engineering Technology program teamed up with the ISU GIS Training and Research Center and ISU Facilities Services to create a mobile map of the ISU Centennial Rock Walk that is accessible on smart phones.

To access the rock walk on a smart phone or computer visit the following Idaho Museum of Natural History web link http://idahostateu.com/isurockwalk.

The ISU Centennial Rock Walk, created in 2001, is comprised of rocks from all 44 Idaho counties that are matched with buildings on the ISU campus in their approximate geographic orientation within Idaho. Each county donated a rock for the rock walk. These rocks are mounted on standardized circular bases, which are placed at buildings across campus. Each rock has a plaque, with information about the rock and its place in Idaho history.

Now people strolling through campus can find out the information for each rock and their proximity to each rock by entering the Internet link above.  When a user hits the icon for the rock they are interested in the website brings up the name of monument, who it was collected by, more information on the rock and photos of it. If the user’s smart phone GPS function is activated the program will also show the user’s location in relation to where the monuments are located on campus.

ROCK ON !

For full story see:  ISU Headlines, posted May 21, 2014.

Ready, Set, Search Our Newest Resources!

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Literature Criticism Online (Gale)
One of the largest curated online collections of literary criticism in the world, this resource includes the complete full-image text of 10 acclaimed multidisciplinary series, representing a range of modern and historical views on authors and their works across regions, eras and genres. Multiple search and browse options are combined with an easy to use format that matches the look and feel of the print originals.

Nineteenth Century Collections Online Archive 9: Science Technology and Medicine 1780-1925, Part II  (Gale)
This second part of the Science, Technology, and Medicine archive includes some three million pages of scientific material from the late seventeenth century through the first quarter of the twentieth century, with a primary focus on the nineteenth century. The collection is divided into four major parts: academies of science publications, natural history, public health, and entomology. Taken together, the documents in this collection offer a rare window onto the development of modern science and its methods.

Political Science Complete (EBSCO)
This database provides extensive coverage of global political topics with a worldwide focus, reflecting the globalization of contemporary political discourse. Designed specifically for students, researchers and government institutions, Political Science Complete (PSC) contains full text for hundreds of journals along with indexing and abstracting for thousands of publications. PSC also provides over 340 full-text reference books and monographs and over 38,000 full-text conference papers, which includes those from the International Political Science Association.

British Periodicals I & II (ProQuest)
This database provides access to the searchable full text of hundreds of periodicals from the late seventeenth century to the early twentieth, comprising millions of high-resolution facsimile page images. Topics covered include literature, philosophy, history, science, the social sciences, music, art, drama, archaeology and architecture.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800
“Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800 has been hailed as the definitive resource for researching every aspect of 17th- and 18th-century America. This incomparable digital collection contains virtually every book, pamphlet and broadside published in America over a 160-year period. Digitized from one of the most important collections ever produced on microform, Early American Imprints, Series I is based on Charles Evans’ renowned “American Bibliography” and Roger Bristol’s supplement. Including more than 36,000 printed works and 2.3 million pages, Series I also offers new imprints not available in microform editions.”

Go to the Eli M. Oboler Library webpage, click on Library Quick Links, then to Databases — Alphabetic and find the database you want to explore!

Why Are Pollinators in Trouble?

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Come to the Library and find out.  Our first floor Display Case 3 investigates the status of the world’s pollinators. Learn about the insecticide Neonicotinoid. Books in this display include The Forgotten Pollinators, Fruitless Fall, Fireflies, Honey & Silk and Silent Spring.  Other books explore the craft of beekeeping- The Ordering of Bees by John Livett published in 1634. These are available for checkout and planting guides from the Pollinator Partnership are yours for the taking.

Display case 1 is titled Pollen: Friend & Foe.  We explore the world of palynology and take a look at the weird, wonderful, alien shapes of pollen and spores.  Understand more about allergies and visualize these little space critters every time you sneeze.

Other new displays on the first floor include the life Maya Angelou who died May 28, 2014 and the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, July 28, 1914.  Peter Macdiarmid’s photos bring the past to life.  And remember,  ARTificer²: the artwork of Juliet and Danielle Feige is on display through the end of July.  Click here for Library Hours.

National Pollinator Week June 16 – 22

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

The Pollinator Partnership is proud to announce that June 16-22, 2014 has been designated National Pollinator Week by the U.S. Department of Interior.

Seven years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations.  Pollinator Week has now grown to be an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles.

The growing concern for pollinators is a sign of progress, but it is vital that we continue to maximize our collective effort.  The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture signs the proclamation every year.

Pollinating animals, including bees, birds, butterflies, bats, beetles and others, are vital to our delicate ecosystem, supporting terrestrial wildlife, providing healthy watershed, and more. Therefore, Pollinator Week is a week to get the importance of pollinators’ message out to as many people as possible.

Pollinators positively effect all our lives- let’s SAVE them and CELEBRATE them!

Source: Pollinators Partnership

Summer Library Workshops

Monday, June 16th, 2014

WHO?

ISU Students, Faculty, Staff

WHAT?

Open training on:

  • How to Find Books at the ISU Library
  • Searching EBSCOhost
  • Advanced Searching Skills

WHEN?

  • June 24th, Tuesday, 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
  • June 25th , Wednesday, 10 am – 11 am

WHERE?

Eli M. Oboler Library, 2nd Floor, Room 212

 

 

 

New Database: Early American Imprints

Friday, June 6th, 2014

We have recently added a new full text database to our collection: Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans (1639-1800)

“Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800 has been hailed as the definitive resource for researching every aspect of 17th- and 18th-century America. This incomparable digital collection contains virtually every book, pamphlet and broadside published in America over a 160-year period. Digitized from one of the most important collections ever produced on microform, Early American Imprints, Series I is based on Charles Evans’ renowned “American Bibliography” and Roger Bristol’s supplement.  Including more than 36,000 printed works and 2.3 million pages, Series I also offers new imprints not available in microform editions.”

History of this Collection

Early American Imprints was originally a microopaque card (not the more common microfiche) collection produced by Readex Microprint. It is based on Evan’s American Bibliography and on Shaw-Shoemaker’s American Bibliography and contains the full text of all known existing books, pamphlets, and broadsides printed in the United States (or British American colonies prior to Independence) from 1639 through 1819, some 72,000 titles.

It is now also available in electronic form as part of the Readex Archive of Americana.

The microprint edition was undertaken by the American Antiquarian Society in 1955 and edited by Dr. Clifford K. Shipton, then director of the Society. The extensive collection of early American imprints in the Society’s library provided a substantial number of the imprints that were filmed. Many other major libraries in the United States and Europe also made texts available and provided editorial corrections to the original bibliographic work of Charles Evans.

The series is available in two parts: Early American Imprints: Series I Evans, 1639–1800, and Early American Imprints: Series II Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801–1819.

Go to the Library webpage and under Library Quick Links find  Databases -  Alphabetic and take time to explore our newest resource!   It is available on and off campus and for all sites.

UNC Celebrates 7 Millionth Book

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

A rare sixteenth century book with modern resonance will become the seven millionth volume in the Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

A public celebration in March marked the acquisition of a book of Latin poetry published in 1573 by Juan Latino. Scholars have described Latino as the first person of sub-Saharan African descent to publish a book of poems in a Western language.

With this milestone, UNC becomes one of only 21 university libraries in North America to hold more than seven million volumes. It also becomes one of a handful of U.S. libraries—including Harvard, Yale, the Boston Public Library, and the New York Public Library—to own this first book of Juan Latino.

Juan Latino was born around 1518 in either Africa or Spain. He was a slave in a noble Spanish household, serving as a page to the family’s son. While accompanying the young duke to classes, Latino learned Latin and Greek. He eventually earned his freedom and became a professor of Latin grammar in Granada. He came to use the surname Latino or Latinus, reflecting his mastery of the Latin language.

The Hanes Foundation gift also included a copy of Latino’s second book, along with ten scholarly books about Latino’s life and work.

They will all become part of the Rare Book Collection in UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library, where librarians expect them to be consulted by students and scholars in many disciplines, including classics, history, comparative literature and Africana and Diaspora studies.

Click here to learn more.

Trial Database: RIPM

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Music Researchers!

We have been given trial access to the Retrospective Index to Music Periodicals (RIPM), through June 17.  This resource  indexes writings on musical history and culture between 1800 and 1950.  If you have some historic music research to do or are curious about the contents to RIPM, give it a try!

There are two different platforms or interfaces to choose from, via RIPMPlus and EBSCOhost.  Access with your ISU ID# and last name if you’re off campus.